Discussion:
Addictive nature of smartphones
(too old to reply)
Unbreakable Disease
2019-10-20 19:02:00 UTC
Permalink
Many people think that smartphones are designed to be addictive. THEY
ARE *NOT*. It's yet another thing said by anti-smartphone propagandists.

However, they are still pretty addictive, and it has got a pretty
natural cause - not by design.

Instant Information - You can search pretty much everything you want to
on mobile web.

Social networking - You don't have to wait until you are at a desktop to
reply to messages on social networks, Usenet (!), etc.

E-mail - I'm addicted to smartphones since 2004, pulling it out of my
pocket every time I feel it vibrating or hear ringing. Most often I will
get some e-mail. That must not be good for my brain.

Mobile Entertainment - Pull out your smart phone when you're bored and
kill time pretty quickly with the whole world of time-wasting
posibilities. Candy Crush Saga, Angry Birds, Instagram, Snapchat,
Vine... Your pocket productivity killers.

Mobile Web - speaks by itself.

Now you know what adds into addictive nature of smartphones
Ant
2019-10-20 20:55:16 UTC
Permalink
Anything can be addictive. I'm addicted to the Internet like usenet,
web, IRC, videos, etc. ;) Smartphones are easy to carry due to their
tiny sizes compared to computers, tablets, etc. Also, they're also
phones since everyone uses them.

I still prefer old desktop PCs with big screens, clicky keyboards,
mouses, fast Internet connections, etc. ;)
Post by Unbreakable Disease
Many people think that smartphones are designed to be addictive. THEY
ARE *NOT*. It's yet another thing said by anti-smartphone propagandists.
However, they are still pretty addictive, and it has got a pretty
natural cause - not by design.
Instant Information - You can search pretty much everything you want to
on mobile web.
Social networking - You don't have to wait until you are at a desktop to
reply to messages on social networks, Usenet (!), etc.
E-mail - I'm addicted to smartphones since 2004, pulling it out of my
pocket every time I feel it vibrating or hear ringing. Most often I will
get some e-mail. That must not be good for my brain.
Mobile Entertainment - Pull out your smart phone when you're bored and
kill time pretty quickly with the whole world of time-wasting
posibilities. Candy Crush Saga, Angry Birds, Instagram, Snapchat,
Vine... Your pocket productivity killers.
Mobile Web - speaks by itself.
Now you know what adds into addictive nature of smartphones
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Your Name
2019-10-21 00:57:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ant
Anything can be addictive. I'm addicted to the Internet like usenet,
web, IRC, videos, etc. ;) Smartphones are easy to carry due to their
tiny sizes compared to computers, tablets, etc. Also, they're also
phones since everyone uses them.
Few mobile phones are used as actual phones. They're mostly used for
texting or messaging apps, as well as pocket cameras and music players.
Post by Ant
I still prefer old desktop PCs with big screens, clicky keyboards,
mouses, fast Internet connections, etc. ;)
Yep. For doing anything useful and easily, a proper computer still
beats trying to fingerpaint on a tablet or mobile phone ... even simply
selecting some text is a pain in the backside on touch devices (without
a stylus anyway).
nospam
2019-10-21 01:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Your Name
For doing anything useful and easily, a proper computer still
beats trying to fingerpaint on a tablet or mobile phone ... even simply
selecting some text is a pain in the backside on touch devices (without
a stylus anyway).
nonsense.
123456789
2019-10-21 02:56:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Your Name
For doing anything useful and easily, a proper computer
still beats trying to fingerpaint on a tablet or mobile
phone ...
I actually find it easier to do my financial business using
the apps on my phone. I haven't been to any bank, CC, or
investment website (or inside any branches) in well over
a year. Very very convenient.

I have an app that lets me in my car if I accidentally lock
the keys inside. The home computer doesn't have an app
for that even if I could call someone at home to fire it up
to let me in.

I can buy reserved seats at my local movie theater on an
app. I just show my phone on the way in to bypass the box
office. I suppose I could buy them at the website but
carrying in the computer in on my shoulder might be a bit
awkward...

I often like listen to Bloomberg Radio when out. With no
local stations I use the iHeartRadio app. Again it would be
hard to carry a computer about to do that.

There are several more I could mention. Bottom line: There
are many "useful" things a phone or tablet can do
sans a "proper computer" (your words). In fact as
shown above the opposite is often true...
Your Name
2019-10-21 03:09:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by 123456789
For doing anything useful and easily, a proper computer still beats
trying to fingerpaint on a tablet or mobile phone ...
I actually find it easier to do my financial business using
the apps on my phone. I haven't been to any bank, CC, or
investment website (or inside any branches) in well over
a year. Very very convenient.
I have an app that lets me in my car if I accidentally lock
the keys inside. The home computer doesn't have an app
for that even if I could call someone at home to fire it up
to let me in.
I can buy reserved seats at my local movie theater on an
app. I just show my phone on the way in to bypass the box
office. I suppose I could buy them at the website but
carrying in the computer in on my shoulder might be a bit
awkward...
I often like listen to Bloomberg Radio when out. With no
local stations I use the iHeartRadio app. Again it would be
hard to carry a computer about to do that.
There are several more I could mention. Bottom line: There
are many "useful" things a phone or tablet can do
sans a "proper computer" (your words). In fact as
shown above the opposite is often true...
There was a word missing there ... I meant to say "useful *workwise*".

Of course there are lots of things a mobile device is good at,
otherwise they wouldn't have lasted this long.
Mayayana
2019-10-21 13:26:59 UTC
Permalink
"Your Name" <***@YourISP.com> wrote

| > There are several more I could mention. Bottom line: There
| > are many "useful" things a phone or tablet can do
| > sans a "proper computer" (your words). In fact as
| > shown above the opposite is often true...
|
| There was a word missing there ... I meant to say "useful *workwise*".
|
| Of course there are lots of things a mobile device is good at,
| otherwise they wouldn't have lasted this long.
|

Not only useful. Exclusive. I'm increasingly seeing younger
people who socialize online, call Uber for a ride, DoorDash
for supper, Tinder to get laid, Amazon to stock up on toilet
paper, ApplePay to buy coffee.... It's becoming a dual culture.

Phone users become addicts without a choice. Their whole
way of life begins to revolve around their phone. Besides the
obvious disadvantages of not seeing other people and paying
higher prices, they also end up trapped in what might be called
the Facebook Effect: All of their life activities are needlessly
taken over by a commercial [usually sleazy] middleman
business and then sold back to them.

Non-phone-addicts are increasingly shut out
of that way of life. They can't keep in touch on Instagram,
nor meet lovers on Tinder, nor call an Uber, etc. Phone addicts,
on the other hand, are increasingly blocked from socializing
in person, going to the woods or rural areas with no cell service,
etc. (Urban geeks don't realize that large areas in the US actually
have no cell service or even highspeed Internet.) The phone
users *can* do those things. But it becomes deeply
disruptive because their normal daily routines, that they do
almost constantly, won't function. (I see these people on the
subway. They unconsciously take out their phone, scroll through
the latest selfies that friends have sent, then put their phone away.
Then, with no more than a 2-3 second gap, they do the exact same
thing again, unaware that they're caught in a hypnotic addiction
loop.)
So it's increasingly becoming two parallel cultures.
sms
2019-10-21 15:45:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
Not only useful. Exclusive. I'm increasingly seeing younger
people who socialize online, call Uber for a ride, DoorDash
for supper, Tinder to get laid, Amazon to stock up on toilet
paper, ApplePay to buy coffee.... It's becoming a dual culture.
I've been to China several times in the past few years. I was just in
Italy last month. It's not a dual culture at least in those parts of
Europe or Asia.

In China and Italy: Everyone, young or old, rich or poor, is on their
phone constantly. Much worse than in the U.S..

In China, Everyone, young or old, uses WeChat Pay or AliPay for
purchases. Many people don't carry a wallet or any cash at all because
literally every retailer takes electronic payments, even street vendors,
and cash is seen as an annoyance. I wonder when beggars will start
taking electronic payments.

In Italy, Italians, young or old, pay for almost everything with Apple
Pay or Google Pay, and the merchants don't mind, even for low-value
transactions, because the merchant credit card fees are much lower in
the EU than in the U.S..

In China, even in the few places that Apple Pay works, it requires a
Chinese credit card as the underlying payment method so a foreigner
can't use it. I never was at any retailer or restaurant that took Apple
Pay so I never tried it. Google Pay is non-existent.

Since foreigners without a Chinese bank account are not allowed to sign
up and fund WeChat Pay or Alipay accounts, it's us 外国人 (foreigners) that
hold things up by paying cash. Few places take credit cards other than
hotels and large department stores. I went to Costco in Shanghai in
August and they don't accept the Citibank Costco Visa card, only their
own Ping An Bank Visa card, as well as AliPay, WeChat Pay, and cash. It
was only non-Chinese citizens paying with cash.

In China and Italy everyone uses electronic payment for transportation,
whether it's DiDi in China (Uber equivalent), bus, subway, or trains. In
China and Italy, Foreigners can buy tickets for the subway and trains
and use cash on the bus. I rode the bus three times on my last trip to
China and I was the only one paying cash. In China, foreigners can sign
up for DiDi with a credit card (Chinese cannot use a credit card with
DiDi). I could not get the Android DiDi app to work in English, but the
iPhone DiDi app did work
<https://apps.apple.com/us/app/didi-greater-china/id554499054>. There is
no ride-sharing allowed in Italy, though I heard that in some cities you
can use Uber with taxis.

In China, usually, the phone is the only internet access device someone
has when not at work, so they aren't going home and using a laptop or
desktop. So large screen phones are the norm. There are some enormous
Android phones in china, literally the size of a small tablet.

In China, everyone uses WeChat for calls and messaging, In Italy, and
most of Europe, and in India, it's WhatsApp.

I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
The Real Bev
2019-10-21 16:48:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
--
Cheers, Bev
" While in high school, we were encouraged to keep a daily journal.
I never liked it, especially when early on I realized that anybody
could find it and read it. Fortunately, the jury never saw it."
-- Anonymous, for obvious reasons
nospam
2019-10-21 18:30:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
he's being disingenuous, as usual.

he is likely referring to the usbank altitude reserve, which gives 3x
points (not cash back) for mobile transactions and also carries a
$400/year annual fee. that does include $325 in travel credits, so the
net cost is $75, but only if you travel enough to use it.
sms
2019-10-21 18:48:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
U.S. Bank Altitude Visa. 3% on mobile purchases (Apple Pay, Google Pay,
Samsung Pay) and on travel purchases even if not mobile purchases.

Before you dismiss it because of the high annual fee, $400, realize that
the annual fee is quickly recovered.

First, they rebate $325 per year in travel charges (hotels, airline
tickets, rental cars), which drops the remaining fee to $75 (assuming
you spend at least $325 per year in travel).

After $7500 in charges per year you have "earned" $225 and you have
recovered that $75 fee with the extra 1% cash back (versus a 2% cash
back card where you "earn" $150 on $7500 in charges).

Other features of this card:
• One-time $500 cashback or $750 travel credit sign-up bonus after $4500
in charges in the first 90 days.
• 12 complimentary domestic Gogo® Inflight Wi-Fi passes per year.
• Complimentary 12-month Priority Pass™ Select membership to more than
1,200 VIP lounges worldwide (it is not clear if this is per year or
one-time).
• TSA Precheck or Global Entry reimbursement every four years.
• Primary rental car insurance coverage (very rare)
• Extended warranty coverage.
• Damage and Theft Protection
• Trip Cancellation & Delay Protection
• Lost & Delayed Baggage Insurance
• Evacuation and Transportation Insurance

You have to open a U.S. Bank account, or have some other U.S. Bank
credit card (like the REI card) in order to apply. I opened a no-fee
checking account at the same time but I don't use it and it has a zero
balance.

See <https://tinyurl.com/creditcardsuggestions>.
The Real Bev
2019-10-21 20:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
U.S. Bank Altitude Visa. 3% on mobile purchases (Apple Pay, Google Pay,
Samsung Pay) and on travel purchases even if not mobile purchases...
I spend NOTHING on travel except maybe gas for day-trips to go skiing.
I've looked at cards with fees, and I've never figured out a way to
break even.

Best I've found is the 2%-back Citi Double Cash card, which I use for
everything except groceries (3% on Amex Blue Cash) and Costco (5% on gas
PLUS [or minus, actually, Costco's cheaper price].
--
Cheers, Bev
A spokesperson for 60s band 'the animals' has today made a
public apology saying they were mistaken and there isn't a
house in New Orleans after all.
sms
2019-10-21 20:57:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
U.S. Bank Altitude Visa. 3% on mobile purchases (Apple Pay, Google Pay,
Samsung Pay) and on travel purchases even if not mobile purchases...
I spend NOTHING on travel except maybe gas for day-trips to go skiing.
I've looked at cards with fees, and I've never figured out a way to
break even.
Yes, unless you spend at least $325 per year on travel (hotels,
air-fare, car rentals, cruises, etc.), the Altitude Visa isn't a good deal.
Post by The Real Bev
Best I've found is the 2%-back Citi Double Cash card, which I use for
everything except groceries (3% on Amex Blue Cash) and Costco (5% on gas
PLUS [or minus, actually, Costco's cheaper price].
I have that card. But now I use it only for the true virtual credit card
capability. On September 22, 2019 Citibank removed many of the good
features of that card: "Effective September 22, 2019, Worldwide Car
Rental Insurance, Trip Cancellation & Interruption Protection, Worldwide
Travel Accident Insurance, Citi® Price Rewind, 90 Day Return Protection,
Damage & Theft Purchase Protection, and Extended Warranty will be
discontinued and will no longer be provided for purchases made on or
after that date. Coverage for purchases made before that date will
continue to be available, and you may continue to file for benefits in
accordance with the current benefit terms."
Mayayana
2019-10-21 20:59:49 UTC
Permalink
"The Real Bev" <***@gmail.com> wrote

| >> What bank gives 3% on everything?
| >
| > U.S. Bank Altitude Visa. 3% on mobile purchases (Apple Pay, Google Pay,
| > Samsung Pay) and on travel purchases even if not mobile purchases...
|
| I spend NOTHING on travel except maybe gas for day-trips to go skiing.
| I've looked at cards with fees, and I've never figured out a way to
| break even.
|
The fee-based, high return cards are somewhat of a trend.
But they only make sense for people who are zealous consumers.
I suppose that's true of anything. Even with Amazon Prime it's
not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
shopping.

My bank, TD, has been sending me offers lately with a 1/2/3
design. I'd pay a fee, I think. Then I'd get 1, 2, or 3% back depending
on what I buy. But the interest rate is absurdly high and the cash
back is only a good deal if I do a lot of entertainment spending.
Which I don't. And of course, there's really no bargain in the long
run. If you get cash back then the price has been raised to account
for that.
123456789
2019-10-21 21:33:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
Even with Amazon Prime it's
not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
shopping.
Yup. The more I spend the more free shipping I get... :-/

But I do make good use the "free" movies, music, and ebooks.
Mayayana
2019-10-22 00:54:57 UTC
Permalink
"123456789" <***@12345.com> wrote

| > Even with Amazon Prime it's
| > not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
| > shopping.
|
| Yup. The more I spend the more free shipping I get... :-/
|
| But I do make good use the "free" movies, music, and ebooks.

Most purchases are available with a free shipping option
anyway, from what I've seen. But if you're getting free movies
I could see that being worthwhile. I don't stream and don't
do business with Amazon in general. I also don't buy much
that I don't need. So for me it would be hard to justify the
membership. (Though I wonder why you put "free" in quotes.
Aren't you getting to stream newish movies that you'd otherwise
have to pay for? Or is the deal limited?)
nospam
2019-10-22 01:14:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| > Even with Amazon Prime it's
| > not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
| > shopping.
|
| Yup. The more I spend the more free shipping I get... :-/
|
| But I do make good use the "free" movies, music, and ebooks.
Most purchases are available with a free shipping option
anyway, from what I've seen.
amazon's free non-prime shipping can take a week or more to arrive.

with prime, it's 2 day, sometimes less, even same day in some cases.
123456789
2019-10-22 01:24:10 UTC
Permalink
I do make good use the "free" [Prime] movies, music,
and ebooks.
if you're getting free movies I could see that being
worthwhile.
It's similar to Netflix with different content.
I don't stream and don't do business with Amazon in
general.
I buy lots using Amazon. Mostly things cheaper or
unavailable locally. I also have near 500 books in my Kindle
account. Now with Prime I can borrow (no time limit) ebooks
for free. So that's a (tiny) savings...
I wonder why you put "free" in quotes.
Because of course it's not "free". It's paid for with the
subscription price.
Aren't you getting to stream newish movies that you'd
otherwise have to pay for? Or is the deal limited?)
Lots of Prime Video "free" movies available but if you want
'newish' they're rentals...
Mayayana
2019-10-22 03:13:17 UTC
Permalink
"123456789" <***@12345.com> wrote

| >> I do make good use the "free" [Prime] movies, music,
| >> and ebooks.
|
| > if you're getting free movies I could see that being
| > worthwhile.
|
| It's similar to Netflix with different content.
|
| > I don't stream and don't do business with Amazon in
| > general.
|
| I buy lots using Amazon. Mostly things cheaper or
| unavailable locally. I also have near 500 books in my Kindle
| account. Now with Prime I can borrow (no time limit) ebooks
| for free. So that's a (tiny) savings...
|
| > I wonder why you put "free" in quotes.
|
| Because of course it's not "free". It's paid for with the
| subscription price.
|
| > Aren't you getting to stream newish movies that you'd
| > otherwise have to pay for? Or is the deal limited?)
|
| Lots of Prime Video "free" movies available but if you want
| 'newish' they're rentals...

I see. Someone was telling me recently that they pay
$3 for some movies. That sounds like what you're
describing. It sounds like the deal is a good one
for you.

I actually just cancelled our Netflix DVD account. For
years it seemed too good to be true. I could see all the
great new movies, anything I wanted, for an average
price of $1-$2. But more recently they've cut back so far
that it was no longer worth it. They don't have what I want
and wouldn't even admit that they had no intention of
getting them. It got to the point that I didn't order anything
because there was nothing available that I wanted to see.

Today I picked up 5 movies at the library, 2-3 of them
are new releases. We just watched
Casablanca. (First time I've seen the whole thing!) So I
think it's the library and rabbit ears for me, from now on.
But I read that Netflix streaming is growing fast. People
don't care that the movie selection is paltry. They're happy
that they can see *some* movie *now*, and that they
can access Netflix TV shows.
123456789
2019-10-22 03:44:33 UTC
Permalink
Someone was telling me recently that they pay $3 for
some movies. That sounds like what you're describing
[with Prime].
Yes Prime rentals are usually in the range of $3 to $6.
I read that Netflix streaming is growing fast. People
don't care that the movie selection is paltry.
Netflix (streaming) has thousands of videos (TV, movies,
documentaries, etc.) to choose from.
I think it's the library and rabbit ears for me, from now
on.
Driving to the library?? If you stayed home and streamed you
could better save the planet... ;)
Mayayana
2019-10-22 13:09:10 UTC
Permalink
"123456789" <***@12345.com> wrote

| > I read that Netflix streaming is growing fast. People
| > don't care that the movie selection is paltry.
|
| Netflix (streaming) has thousands of videos (TV, movies,
| documentaries, etc.) to choose from.
|

Yes, but if you don't want to see the unreleased movie
where Chuck Norris plays a stay-at-home-Dad, or the one
about cans of cheese curls from outer space attacking Akron,
then the selection is limited.

It certainly wouldn't be worth
it to me, assuming I was willing to set up the streaming
hardware in the first place. But I can see the other side.
If you have company over and want to see *something*
right now, it's handy. I suspect the main appeal,
though, is just that Netflix have made some successful
TV shows. (Though I can't name one offhand.) And they're
licensing shows. They recently gave up rights to Friends
but are paying for exclusive streaming rights for Seinfeld.
I think they're paying $100 million/year, if I remember
correctly. That's astonishing to me. With my local, OTA
TV channels, Seinfeld is harder to avoid than the commercials
for vaginal mesh implant lawsuits. But clearly they know their
market. People want that stuff. And no one wants to be
ignorant, around the water cooler at work, about what
happened last night on the latest streaming, medeival
fantasy soap opera. That seems to be the key to this: TV
is the cultural medium in the 1st world and no one wants to
be left out. (With the recent Emmy's I'd never even heard of
most of the shows, much less have access to see them. That's
a radical departure from how I grew up, with everyone in
America watching Ed Sullivan on Sunday night. The cultural
medium, icons, and archetypes are splintering into numerous
venues.)

| > I think it's the library and rabbit ears for me, from now
| > on.
|
| Driving to the library?? If you stayed home and streamed you
| could better save the planet... ;)
|
True. Now that you put it that way, I see that I can't
afford *not* to spend $300/month for streaming, spyware
multimedia. And how have I resisted so long the temptation
to binge-watch 162 hours of Jennifer Anniston being
preternaturally anti-sexy -- to the point of being a walking,
talking, erectile dysfunction disorder -- while her "Friends"
argue over what's for dinner? :)
123456789
2019-10-22 15:23:21 UTC
Permalink
if you don't want to see the unreleased movie where Chuck
Norris plays a stay-at-home-Dad, or the one about cans of
cheese curls from outer space attacking Akron, then the
selection is limited.
If you can't find something to watch out of the thousands of
videos offered then Netflix is not for you.
It certainly wouldn't be worth it to me,
YMMV. I'm not the only one who uses it in my house. Lots of
stuff for the grandkids bedtime movie (I pop the popcorn)
when they stay over.
assuming I was willing to set up the streaming hardware
in the first place.
You can watch movies on your laptop, no extra hardware
necessary. Or a tablet. Or a smart TV. Or an HDMI cable from
your laptop to a dumb TV.
I can't afford *not* to spend $300/month for streaming,
spyware multimedia.
Netflix costs me $9.78/mo USD. The paranoia is free... :)
Mayayana
2019-10-22 16:17:57 UTC
Permalink
"123456789" <***@12345.com> wrote

| > assuming I was willing to set up the streaming hardware
| > in the first place.
|
| You can watch movies on your laptop, no extra hardware
| necessary. Or a tablet. Or a smart TV. Or an HDMI cable from
| your laptop to a dumb TV.
|

That's assuming a setup. For you, entertainment addiction is
a way of life. For me it would cost. First I'd have
to change my ISP plan for faster service. (We get the low tier
because it's more than fast enough for what we do.) To watch
on the TV I'd need to set up a dedicated computer and run
a network cable from the router. Or if I wanted to settle for only
Netflix I'd need to still run the cable. And I couldn't see it on
our upstair TV. Which is not even getting into the spyware
issues with "smart" TVs and streaming. Why do I want to let
them watch me and cater ads?

Any movie I'd be happy to watch on my [non-existent] laptop
or [non-existent] tablet is a movie I don't need to see.


| > I can't afford *not* to spend $300/month for streaming,
| > spyware multimedia.
|
| Netflix costs me $9.78/mo USD. The paranoia is free... :)

Yes, but by your own description, that cost is more than
doubled if you choose to see 2 recent movies. That's far
more expensive than the old DVD deal, where I could see
as many movies as I could watch and mail back, with the
only limitation being that I couldn't get them for a couple
of months after release.

The $300 number comes from people I know who actually
do spend that much for interrnet, cable TV, pay-per-view,
and several streaming services.
nospam
2019-10-22 16:31:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| > assuming I was willing to set up the streaming hardware
| > in the first place.
|
| You can watch movies on your laptop, no extra hardware
| necessary. Or a tablet. Or a smart TV. Or an HDMI cable from
| your laptop to a dumb TV.
|
That's assuming a setup.
at most, a cable to a separate tv.

if you watch on your computer, no additional setup is needed.
Post by Mayayana
For you, entertainment addiction is
a way of life. For me it would cost. First I'd have
to change my ISP plan for faster service. (We get the low tier
because it's more than fast enough for what we do.)
streaming doesn't need much bandwidth.

netflix recommends 5 mbit/s for 1080p.

<https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306>

or download and watch later.
Post by Mayayana
The $300 number comes from people I know who actually
do spend that much for interrnet, cable TV, pay-per-view,
and several streaming services.
some might, but most people spend *much* less.
123456789
2019-10-22 17:06:46 UTC
Permalink
For you, entertainment addiction is a way of life.
Guilty as charged. But most of my entertainment addiction is
reading apps on the tablet (news, Kindle, Usenet, etc). I
mainly use Netflix to watch while walking on the treadmill
45 minutes a day. Netflix keeps my place in the movie when I
stop so that I can resume the next day. Very handy.
Post by 123456789
Netflix costs me $9.78/mo USD.
Yes, but by your own description, that cost is more than
doubled if you choose to see 2 recent movies.
If you are referring to movie rentals, Netflix doesn't rent
movies. My earlier rental comment referred to my "free"
Amazon Prime Video service.
That's far more expensive than the old DVD deal, where I
could see as many movies as I could watch and mail back,
with the only limitation being that I couldn't get them
for a couple of months after release.
There's no limitation on the number of movies you can watch
on the Netflix streaming service and no mail hassle
involved.
The $300 number comes from people I know who actually do
spend that much for interrnet, cable TV, pay-per-view,
and several streaming services.
Cable packages can be that expensive. But a package isn't
necessary to use Netflix. The minimum offered ISP speed is
usually fine for a single stream. However if you are a heavy
use family with simultaneous devices running maybe not...
sms
2019-10-22 17:14:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| > assuming I was willing to set up the streaming hardware
| > in the first place.
|
| You can watch movies on your laptop, no extra hardware
| necessary. Or a tablet. Or a smart TV. Or an HDMI cable from
| your laptop to a dumb TV.
|
That's assuming a setup. For you, entertainment addiction is
a way of life. For me it would cost. First I'd have
to change my ISP plan for faster service. (We get the low tier
because it's more than fast enough for what we do.)
I have the lowest tier Xfinity plan and it's certainly fast enough for
Netflix and Amazon Prime streaming.

Remember, you don't have to stream in UHD. Netflix recommends 3Mb/s for
SD, 5Mb/s for HD, and 25Mb/s for UHD. I think my Xfinity plan is 50Mb/s.

The smart TVs, Roku boxes, and Apple TV do work better with a wired
connection from the router, though if I upgraded my wireless
infrastructure from 802.11g to 802.11n this might no longer be the case.

It's gotten a lot simpler with the advent of smart TVs since you don't
need a separate box and separate remote. My wife won't use the older TV
we have downstairs with a separate streaming box, apparently having to
select the source for the TV is too complicated (yet she can operate
complex life-saving medical equipment at work). However she has no
problem with the smart TV where Netflix and Amazon Prime are built in.

Netflix has lost interest in the DVD side of the business and even in
providing a good selection of movies for streaming. They're really into
their own content now. If I want new releases I go to Redbox with their
endless promotions it's well under $2. Our library has a huge selection
of movies as well.
Apd
2019-10-22 20:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
TV
is the cultural medium in the 1st world and no one wants to
be left out.
You can leave me out unless it's comedy, a documentary or classic
film noir.
Post by Mayayana
And how have I resisted so long the temptation
to binge-watch 162 hours of Jennifer Anniston being
preternaturally anti-sexy -- to the point of being a walking,
talking, erectile dysfunction disorder -- while her "Friends"
argue over what's for dinner? :)
What a great description of her. "preternaturally"; you learn
something every (most) day(s).

sms
2019-10-22 10:50:58 UTC
Permalink
On 10/21/2019 8:13 PM, Mayayana wrote:

<snip>
Post by Mayayana
Today I picked up 5 movies at the library,
<snip>

Ditto. Our library has a huge selection of movies. And I can walk there
in five minutes.
nospam
2019-10-21 21:39:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
The fee-based, high return cards are somewhat of a trend.
But they only make sense for people who are zealous consumers.
it makes sense for people who reguarlly do whatever the card is
designed for, whether it's buy groceries, travel, dine out, shop at
certain merchants or whatever else it is.
Post by Mayayana
I suppose that's true of anything. Even with Amazon Prime it's
not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
shopping.
it doesn't take that much shopping to recover the amazon prime fee if
you consider that typical shipping fees are typically around $10 per
order, not to mention the other benefits prime includes.
Post by Mayayana
My bank, TD, has been sending me offers lately with a 1/2/3
design. I'd pay a fee, I think. Then I'd get 1, 2, or 3% back depending
on what I buy.
there is no fee for td's 3/2/1 card.
Post by Mayayana
But the interest rate is absurdly high
pay the bill in full every month and the interest rate makes absolutely
no difference whatsoever.
Post by Mayayana
and the cash
back is only a good deal if I do a lot of entertainment spending.
that depends on the card. normally, cash back can be used on any
purchase or used to buy gift cards or even get sent a check. some cards
restrict it to travel, but that is usually broadly defined.

there are many, many other options, and it need not be at the same bank
you have a checking/savings account.
Post by Mayayana
Which I don't. And of course, there's really no bargain in the long
run. If you get cash back then the price has been raised to account
for that.
other than fuel purchases, there is rarely a cash discount in stores.
the price is the same regardless of payment method.
sms
2019-10-21 22:45:54 UTC
Permalink
On 10/21/2019 1:59 PM, Mayayana wrote:

<snip>
Post by Mayayana
My bank, TD, has been sending me offers lately with a 1/2/3
design. I'd pay a fee, I think. Then I'd get 1, 2, or 3% back depending
on what I buy. But the interest rate is absurdly high and the cash
back is only a good deal if I do a lot of entertainment spending.
Which I don't. And of course, there's really no bargain in the long
run. If you get cash back then the price has been raised to account
for that.
I look for cards without all the categories, too complicated. I want a
flat percentage back.

I travel a moderate amount so the Altitude Visa is a good deal for me.
The fee is essentially $75 for me since we easily charge $325 per year
directly with hotels, airlines, and rental car companies, and the 3%
cash back (versus 2% on other cards) makes up the other $75 in just a
few months.

The other benefits are things that are nice to have but that I probably
would not pay for, like in-flight Wi-Fi, lounge access, and TSA Precheck
or Global Entry. One really nice thing to have is primary rental car
insurance, and this is offered by very very few cards.

The interest rate is of no concern since we pay the card off every month.
sms
2019-10-21 22:54:26 UTC
Permalink
On 10/21/2019 1:59 PM, Mayayana wrote:

<snip>
Post by Mayayana
The fee-based, high return cards are somewhat of a trend.
But they only make sense for people who are zealous consumers.
I suppose that's true of anything. Even with Amazon Prime it's
not easy to make back the yearly fee unless you do a lot of
shopping.
Perhaps, but remember that each member of the family doesn't need their
own Amazon Prime account.

In my family we share one account between my wife and I, and our college
age kids, and college kids get a 50% discount on Amazon Prime.

I probably would not sign up for Amazon Prime at the $119 regular price
because there's free shipping for orders over $25 anyway.
nospam
2019-10-21 21:39:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
I spend NOTHING on travel except maybe gas for day-trips to go skiing.
I've looked at cards with fees, and I've never figured out a way to
break even.
then a travel card is not for you.

there are numerous other options.
Post by The Real Bev
Best I've found is the 2%-back Citi Double Cash card, which I use for
everything except groceries (3% on Amex Blue Cash) and Costco (5% on gas
PLUS [or minus, actually, Costco's cheaper price].
if you spend more than $3166 a year on groceries (about $60/week, which
is very easy), the amex blue cash preferred is a better choice,
especially since the no-fee blue cash card will be losing most of its
benefits in a couple of months.
Your Name
2019-10-22 00:39:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
Post by The Real Bev
Post by sms
I live in the U.S. and I'm old. But I now pay for everything with Google
Pay, Apple Pay, or Samsung Pay tied to my 3% back credit card, and it
only gives 3% if it's a mobile payment. The older people in the U.S.
will eventually adopt the technology already in use by the younger
people. WhatsApp is catching on, even among boomers, as is mobile
payment. Being old and married I can't speak about Tinder.
What bank gives 3% on everything?
U.S. Bank Altitude Visa. 3% on mobile purchases (Apple Pay, Google Pay,
Samsung Pay) and on travel purchases even if not mobile purchases...
I spend NOTHING on travel except maybe gas for day-trips to go skiing.
I've looked at cards with fees, and I've never figured out a way to
break even.
Best I've found is the 2%-back Citi Double Cash card, which I use for
everything except groceries (3% on Amex Blue Cash) and Costco (5% on
gas PLUS [or minus, actually, Costco's cheaper price].
My Visa card here in New Zealand gives me rewards points which
calculates to be earning about 12% back ... BUT only when purchasing at
certain partner stores. The number of partner store brands is quite
small, but includes a range of products: petrol station, bookshop,
department stores, electronics store, cinema, jewllery stores,
restaurants, and travel.

The rewards points can be redeemed via the bank's online store (which
works out expensive) or used at the partner stores to buy things (which
is cheaper when they have a sale) via a separate debit card. Points can
also be converted into fuel discounts, given to charities as money
donations, or added to your KiwiSaver retirement plan (semi-compulsory
system run for the Government by various banks and finacnce companies).

I've recently used some collected points to get the ink cartridges for
my printer (tri-colour and black), an external hard drive, and a couple
of books. :-)

Unfortunately they did add a fee to the rewards system some while back,
which is separate to the credit card fee. :-(
Mayayana
2019-10-21 17:36:16 UTC
Permalink
"sms" <***@geemail.com> wrote

| I've been to China several times in the past few years. I was just in
| Italy last month. It's not a dual culture at least in those parts of
| Europe or Asia.
|
| In China and Italy: Everyone, young or old, rich or poor, is on their
| phone constantly. Much worse than in the U.S..
|

Very interesting info. Thanks. It gives me the creeps in terms
of privacy, to think of using commercial, middleman apps for
all transactions. Especially in China.
sms
2019-10-21 18:51:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| I've been to China several times in the past few years. I was just in
| Italy last month. It's not a dual culture at least in those parts of
| Europe or Asia.
|
| In China and Italy: Everyone, young or old, rich or poor, is on their
| phone constantly. Much worse than in the U.S..
|
Very interesting info. Thanks. It gives me the creeps in terms
of privacy, to think of using commercial, middleman apps for
all transactions. Especially in China.
There are different expectations of privacy in different countries.
123456789
2019-10-21 19:05:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by sms
There are different expectations of privacy in different
countries.
And personal space judging from some foreign tourists I
encounter here (US).
sms
2019-10-22 14:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| I've been to China several times in the past few years. I was just in
| Italy last month. It's not a dual culture at least in those parts of
| Europe or Asia.
|
| In China and Italy: Everyone, young or old, rich or poor, is on their
| phone constantly. Much worse than in the U.S..
|
Very interesting info. Thanks. It gives me the creeps in terms
of privacy, to think of using commercial, middleman apps for
all transactions. Especially in China.
Read "This Perfect Day" by Ira Levin <https://www.amazon.com/dp/160598129X>.
Mayayana
2019-10-22 15:31:00 UTC
Permalink
"sms" <***@geemail.com> wrote

| > Very interesting info. Thanks. It gives me the creeps in terms
| > of privacy, to think of using commercial, middleman apps for
| > all transactions. Especially in China.
|
| Read "This Perfect Day" by Ira Levin
<https://www.amazon.com/dp/160598129X>.

I guess it's telling that you chose, as a link to
explain your recommendation, the Amazon page for
buying the book. :)

It's interesting that these dystopian tales generally
involve coercion and the cure is individualism. But the
dilemma we face is more a case of people wanting to be
coddled. Of course there are creepy aspects like Chinese
oppression, US law enforcement getting carried way with
data collection, and other quite dangerous developments.
But for the most part people want their data collected
and they want their devices to guess their desires.

I used to know an Apple programmer who once
told me that his dream was to have a phone that would
tell him what to do. And now he pretty much has that.
Of course it requires a vast amount of setup, but with
enough money and careful planning, no one really has
to deal with the hassle of living their own life anymore. :)
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